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        IMA

New start-up Ironjaw launches clamping force booster for injection presses

Cutting-edge-technology

Ironjaw, a new player in the injection moulding machine market, has launched what it says is the first clamping-force “booster” system for injection presses. The technology, which can be adapted to all types of moulds, is said to increase the capacity of the injection press, enabling 30-60% more clamping force.

Based in Lisbon, Portugal, the company was set up by Bruno Machet and Alex Guichard, the Founder of RocTool and Revology. It is said to be the first European start-up specialising in boosting the clamping force of injection presses.

“Our system has been successfully tested on several million R&D-stage parts, leading us to create a company that is dedicated to the technology in order to provide the world’s plastics processors and moulders with a cost-effective solution to boost press capacity. The technology makes it possible to use presses that are less powerful but more energy efficient to achieve the same result, with an immediate impact on part production prices,” explains Ironjaw Founder/CEO Bruno Machet.

Ironjaw technology uses a system of steel “jaws” to clamp the mould. “The technology produces spectacular gains in moulding pressure – up to 60%, depending on the configuration – and decreases or even eliminates flash! It works with all types of plastics, including recycled materials,” continued Machet. It took five years to develop the system, which is now patented.

Injection moulding concerns all sectors that use plastics: building & construction, packaging, automotive, electronics, and more. The start-up company has developed a standard range of Ironjaw systems, from S to XL, to cater to the industry applications.

Ironjaw says that major equipment manufacturers in Europe and the US will be testing the Ironjaw innovation over the next few months and the first industrial deliveries are announced for mid-2017.

(IMA)


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